Journal of Cytology
Home About us Ahead of print Instructions Submission Subscribe Advertise Contact e-Alerts Login 
Users Online:1619
  Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size


 
 Table of Contents    
LETTER TO EDITOR  
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 181-182
Aspergillus involving submandibular salivary gland: An unusual presentation


Department of Cytology and Gynecologic Pathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Web Publication29-Nov-2014
 

How to cite this article:
Tyagi R, Dey P. Aspergillus involving submandibular salivary gland: An unusual presentation. J Cytol 2014;31:181-2

How to cite this URL:
Tyagi R, Dey P. Aspergillus involving submandibular salivary gland: An unusual presentation. J Cytol [serial online] 2014 [cited 2020 Jul 13];31:181-2. Available from: http://www.jcytol.org/text.asp?2014/31/3/181/145671


Sir,

Aspergillus is seen worldwide as community or hospital acquired infection. Aspergillus are known to cause infections in human beings, [1] out of which about 80% of infections are caused by Aspergillus fumigatus. Aspergillus flavus is commonly involved in sinusitis. [2] The lung is commonly infected by this fungus. Aspergillus has also been demonstrated in extrapulmonary sites such as orbit, molar region, canthus of the eye and maxillary area. [3] Hereby, we are describing an unusual case of Aspergillus involving the right submandibular gland.

A 45-years-old man complained of a firm, painless swelling in the submandibular region for past 3 months. He was empirically started on anti-tuberculous therapy, but the swelling remained as such. The submandibular swelling was subsequently subjected to fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). The swelling was very firm and yielded only scanty material on FNAC. The smears showed numerous epithelioid cell granulomas with scattered multinucleated giant cells in a dirty necrotic background. Many scattered Aspergillus fungi were seen. The fungi showed thin septated structure with acute angle branching as negative profiles. Many flat sheets of benign salivary ductal epithelial cells were also noted. Periodic acid Schiff stain showed better demonstration of the fungal hyphae with acute angle branching consistent with the morphology of Aspergillus [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. Ziehl Neelsen stain for acid-fast bacilli was negative.
Figure 1: Aspergillus in the multinuclated giant cell (Periodic acid Schiff , ×440)

Click here to view
Figure 2: Higher magnification showing acute angle branching in Aspergillus (Periodic acid Schiff , ×1200)

Click here to view


Aspergillus shows dichotomously acute angle branched septated hyphae of uniform thickness (five to ten microns). [3] Fungal culture is required to confirm the species of Aspergillus. In this case, as the fungal infection was not suspected clinically, hence fungal culture was not sent. The diagnosis on FNAC was helpful in further management of the patient as the patient responded to antimycotic treatment.

 
   References Top

1.
Pfaller MA, Diekema DJ. Epidemiology of invasive mycoses in North America. Crit Rev Microbiol 2010;36:1-53.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Nicolle MC, Benet T, Vanhems P. Aspergillosis: Nosocomial or community-acquired? Med Mycol 2011;9:S24-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Das R, Dey P, Chakrabarti A, Ray P. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy in fungal infections. Diagn Cytopathol 1997;16:31-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Pranab Dey
Department of Cytology and Gynecologic Pathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-9371.145671

Rights and Permissions


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed978    
    Printed22    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded63    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal